Supercomputer

The Institute of Technology, Shimizu Corporation, the results of tests using large wind tunnels are being replicated by ultra-large-scale simulations, using a supercomputer called the K Computer. In this way, the researchers are working to develop a new method for detailed prediction of instantaneous maximum local wind pressure acting on building.

Hokkaido University and RIKEN AICS are researching aerodynamics simulation, to simulate the air flow around automobiles.
Investigating the force exerted by air on a moving car is essential for improving fuel efficiency and safety. In particular, using a supercomputer called K has made it possible to simulate air resistance, which is the most important factor, with a precision equivalent to wind tunnel tests.

Dr. Yoshiyuki Kaneda serves as manager of R&D projects for the HPCI strategic program field 3 -Advanced Prediction Research for Natural Disaster Prevention and Reduction-conducting research for improvement of prediction accuracy of earthquakes and tsunamis. This research has three main themes: earthquake, tsunami, and evaluation of damage to cities caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. This research is conducted by using the K computer.

Osaka has long been the home to many pharmaceutical companies in japan. The NPO Biogrid Center Kansai, located in Grand Front Osaka (opened in 2013), partners with universities and pharmaceutical companies to lay the groundwork for in silico drug discovery using the K computer. In silico means leveraging new IT-based techniques for drug discovery in addition to traditional experiment-based techniques.

RIKEN New Supercomputer - AkihabaraNews.com

November’s SC13 Supercomputer Conference confirmed China’s Tianhe 2, clocked at 33.86 PETAFLOPS, as the world’s fastest. Japan’s K Computer comes in at #4, but the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science has plans to smash both rankings, and it’s impressive, but also relative.

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