What Japanese Food Tech Makes this Girl go from Suspicious to Smiles?

What Japanese Food Tech Makes this Girl go from Suspicious to Smiles? - AkihabaraNews.com

Sudden Sushi Train Camera Fame, of Course!
Now, the thing is, is that kids love to be on camera, most probably because:

A. They want to see images of themselves for practical reference: which is understandable because they're kids and as such have not yet assembled and internalized a comprehensive visual self-image; need more input. 
B. Unfiltered, unadulterated narcissism: to kids, they themselves are the most interesting thing in the universe, and, unlike adults, they haven't yet figured out that successfully masking this proclivity is what gets you invited to the cool parties. 

The anonymous little girl in the main image knows she's the star, and she'd probably appreciate a copy of the video for private study.

And this is a great video - a great window of perspective we almost...yeah, basically never see. How do we have this?

Okay, Okay - I'mma Tell You a Joke:
So this White Girl Puts a Camera on the Sushi Train...

Alight, it's not a joke, but it is
 important to this narrative to mention that it was in fact a white girl (or non-Japanese of whatever flavor) who put the camera on the sushi train. Because:

A. The unwritten Japanese Laws of Racial and/or Ethnic Probability dictate that he'd or she'd almost have to be a foreigner, most likely a Westerner, to have the stones and/or gall to put it on there in the first place; this is context.
B. It really helps in the "Getting away with it and not being judged for assclownery" department, i.e., a large man or woman with a sushi knife doesn't storm out of the kitchen all pissed off in this video; no one is berated or shamed here, and things 
end well. 

Honestly, the results do impress. It's a very interesting little window into everyday people doing an everyday thing in Japan. It's also a bit of social time capsule. This video was uploaded 5.5 years ago when most cameras still kinda looked like cameras and people didn't play so fast and loose with their smartphones. These days, an unsupervised camera trying to pull a hobo on the local sushi train might not be judged so kindly, so we're lucky to have this 7-minute nugget of historical culture jamming (3.5 if you put it on 2x, which we recommend).

The sushi joint's staff, well, they're less impressed. As the camera makes its way off the restaurant floor and into the sushi train's uhhh...station, discussion is as follows:

"What's that?"
"Camera."
"Who's camera is that?"
"Some foreigner, I think."
"Meh."

And back on the sushi train it goes.

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