New Tilt-Shift Time Lapse Tokyo Diorama (VIDEO)

New Tilt-Shift Time Lapse Tokyo Diorama (VIDEO) - AkihabaraNews.com

darwinfish105:
Capturing the Beauty of Tokyo from High Places 

As we mentioned the last time around, we’ve really fallen in love with this guy’s work. We shared his giant robot photography last year, featured the previous installment of what we're calling the Tokyo Pastel Diorama Series, totally dug his Panasonic GH4 time lapse piece from several months back, and he made our minds go all rubbery with the Inception/Blade Runner lovechild known as Mirrored Tokyo. Well, there's more.

This Edition:
The World Below the World Trade Center Building Observatory 

WTC Building Observatory Tilt Shift was shot from the namesake iconic Tokyo skyscraper, located just offshore from one of Tokyo Bay's farthest-reaching inlets (MAP), and as is evident, the view is amazing - both for the urban landscape and for the shots of beautiful parks and industry underway.

darwinfish105 captured this video with the Sony α7S (Alpha 7S), a camera we recently reviewed and really, really liked (Specs, Prices, and More Details Here). As before, it's an irony that this particular photographic method can makes the world's largest city, its infrastructure, and its inhabitants look like tiny, tiny toys.

Because Tilt-Shift & Time Lapse 
And what is that, exactly? Well, it’s this kind of photography where you tilt/shift a camera’s focal point, and then maybe shoot for a really long time, and then speed it up to lapse the time. Taken from afar, the method makes things look tiny and cute and softens much of the edges and most of the colors.

We know that's is a total cop-out explanation, but come on now - if you really need to know the fine print, then you’re probably a photographer and that means you probably already know. If you’re not a photographer, but still want to know, then you probably should become a photographer.

See how we do that?

Enjoy the video!

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