Mirrored TOKYO Will Melt Your Brain (VIDEO)

Mirrored TOKYO Will Melt Your Brain (VIDEO)

The Lovechild of Blade Runner and Inception
We've all marveled (some drool) at the incredible cityscapes of the world's largest city, our home: Tokyo.

The contiguous urbanization, beginning at Tokyo Bay, crawls westward and disappears beneath the sky, farther than we can see - not only by distance, but also due to the basic curvature of the earth. It’s just that vast.

Okay, now double that. Twist and turn. Reflect. Go upside down and merge it all together in a videographic collage...the result is the latest hit from YouTuber darwinfish105. Once again, he’s delivered a basically unnotwatchable love letter to the metropolis. Do watch.

Mirrored TOKYO is not his only hit, we’ve also featured his GH4 time-lapse video work: GH4 Time-Lapse Video Makes Tokyo a Living Pastel Diorama (See Panasonic GH4 specs & prices from our photography partner Adorama.com)

And his still photography of giant robots is quite fine, too: Pacific Rim and the Legacy of Giant Japanese Robots

Now, those who haven't visited the metropolis might wonder:

"Is it really all that? 
Does it really look so amazing in person?
These Japanophiles are exaggerating, yeah?"

Yes. 
Yes.
Gigantic nope.

darwinfish105 shot this video with Sony RX100 III, their newest high-end mid-range shooter. Here are a few caps, too:

[MORE]
Videos: Japanese Tech & Cultural AkihabaraNews.com

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