Tokyo's new skyscraper complex Toranomon Hills unveil its mascot character that looks very much like someone

He is not Doraemon. He is TORANOMON!

As one of the Tokyo's current large-scale urban redevelopment projects, another new skyscraper complex is going to open in 2 days in central Tokyo.

The building is called Toranomon Hills and they unveiled its mascot character "Toranomon" collaborated with the animation company Fujiko Pro. Yes, we love mascots!

Fujiko Pro is well-known as the famous Doraemon series. They created the new mascot character Toranomon based on the look of Doraemon.

Toranomon Hills is a 52-story 247-meter tall building. It includes a luxurious hotel, high-class residential floors, office facilities, conference facilities, stores and restaurants.

The center of Tokyo will continue being redeveloped until the opening of 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The city will be more modern and sophisticated than ever and will be absolutely ready to attract visitors from around the world.


 

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