What Does the Fox Say? (JAPANESE COVER)

What Does the Fox Say? - AkihabaraNews.com

Better Late!
Waiting 8 months to cover the wildly popular and wildly misunderstood Ylvis tune The Fox isn't exactly bad form, but the boat has, to a certain degree, been missed. Nonetheless, it's a fine watch. And, it's nice to see that the Japanese contingent appears to be in on the joking silliness of the whole affair - whereas a surprising number of audiotards in the Western World took the Norwegian farce as yet another harbinger of our civilization's ongoing apocalyptic implosion.

That's not to say that pop music in the Western World doesn't suck these days. Because it totally sucks. Hard. Science proved that two years ago.

Whatto Dazu Zha Foxxu Say?
Of course, part of the humor of the Japanese cover is that only about 40% of the lyrics are actually pronounced correctly. And ha, ha, ha - it's not a new joke that the Japanese struggle with English pronunciation, and in all seriousness, it's a profound language barrier. But see, there is a very real, very practical reason that not many people are aware of.

For Japanese and non-Japanese alike, simple awareness of this fact can serve two purposes:

1. Bolster Japanese ESL students' confidence, alleviate the scourge of shyness, and begin the process of inoculating English learners against the devastating 'Perpetually Waiting for Impossible Perfection' syndrome.

2. Give native English speakers an understanding of the exact mechanics of why the Japanese struggle with English pronunciation. This will make us more understanding and linguistically compassionate and less likely to make fun of them so much (uhhhh... maybe). 

The Fact is This:
All told, pronouncing the Japanese lexicon involves squishing air out of your mouth hole to produce about 400 unique sound structures (not phonemes, more complicated than that) and arranging them into various verbal configurations, e.g., 「カラオケ」、ka-ra-o-ke. Or, "carry oki," as most of the rest of the dumb world says.

Now, Because modern English is the bastard child of French, German, Spanish, Italian, Olde English, and a mishmash of globally sourced words and phrases and stuff, fluency in speaking requires about 2000 unique sound structures. And that's why learning English is hard as hell.

Cow goes む。

• • •

Thanks, Nayalan.

Source: 

Related Articles

Percussion Warfare: US Marines vs. Republic of Korea Army (In a Drumming Battle!) - AkihabaraNews.com

The Hopefully Not Too Distant Future of Conflict Resolution
If you’re a fan of drumming or a fan of parades or a fan of uniforms or a fan of humanity, it’s going to be pretty impossible to not get a smile and a wow out of watching this drum battle. Yes, one team is pretty outclassed, but it all seems to be in great fun with both sides getting a lot of applause and appreciation.

Aerial Burton has demonstrated an aerial 3D display, which can project text and images in mid-air.

"The biggest difference between our technology and other displays is, this is a screenless display. This is the only device that can show text and pictures in mid-air, without using a screen.

The new mascot character, "Toranomon" of the new Tokyo skyscraper complex Toranomon Hills has been receiving great response, and tons of people have already visited there to take a photo with Toranomon's statue.

A lot of AkihabaraNews readers liked our past coverage about Toranomon, too:

 

SEL have developed a range of flexible OLED displays and high PPI LCD panels which use CAAC oxide semiconductors.

"CAAC stands for C-Axis Aligned Crystal. In this material's structure, the crystals are aligned in the c-axis direction. Because CAAC itself is crystalline instead of amorphous, it has much higher reliability. Until now, with oxide semiconductors, reliability was generally thought to be a problem, but using this material solves that problem."

Top 5 Japanese Tech Videos of the Week - AkihabaraNews.com

AkihabaraNews on YouTube
The weekly roundup of our new, original tech videos from here in Tokyo and all over Japan, plus favorites from our partners and the best clips from the past week's posts - subscribe and automate! 

Akihabaranews.com - Diginfo.tv - Asukanet - Floating interactive displays in ATMs of the future

The Aerial Imaging (AI) Plate, developed by Asukanet, is a next-generation display device which can form an image which appears to be floating in midair from light that passes through it. By combining this device with sensors, it is also possible to interact with the projected images.

Lotte Fit's recent cutest, oddest, and fluffiest commercial

Akihabaranews.com - Diginfo - TDK - Heat-assisted recording 40 TB HDDs by 2020

TDK has developed a heat-assisted recording technology, which will drastically increase the capacity of hard disk drives.

Editor - May 11, 2014

AkihabaraNews on YouTube!

AkihabaraNews on YouTube
The weekly roundup of our new, original tech videos from here in Tokyo and all over Japan, plus favorites from our partners and the best clips from the past week's posts - subscribe and automate! 

Bonsai Lab, Inc. has released the reasonably-priced compact 3D printer BS01 on April 1.

In December, 2013, 3D printer BS01 was sold for 3 weeks only at the cloud funding site "kibidango". It collected the targeted amount of money after just 2 days, and reached about ¥10,500,000 funding in 3 weeks, an amount about 5 times more than their targeted amount.

Toshiba announced that they will release a new dynabook KIRA series notebook PC, the dynabook KIRA L93 in late June.

The dynabook KIRA L93 has an LCD display that makes a 360-degree turn and a detachable keyboard. So, you can choose the way you want to use it among 7 different ways:

- Notebook PC style
- Tablet style
- Desktop style
- Canvas style
- Flat style
- Tent style

At MWC 2014 (Mobile World Congress 2014), in Barcelona, Spain on February 24, Sony finally OFFICIALLY unveiled their new smartphone Xperia Z2. Many of you might remember that the leaked specs of Xperia Z2 created an internet buzz about 2 weeks ago.

Associate Professor Toshiaki Tsuji's Laboratory at Saitama University has developed R-cloud, a rehabilitation support robot that enables users to view how their own muscles move during rehabilitation and training.

Pages