Koichi Wakata in Space Double Feature: Weekly YouTube Update - Vols. 17 & 19

Koichi Wakata in Space - AkihabaraNews.com

Updates from Low Earth Orbit
JAXA Astronaut Koichi Wakata (Wiki here) is an excellent space resource. From 250 miles (400km) above the earth in his International Space Station residence, he broadcasts entertaining and informative Tweets and photos, and, in cooperation with other crew members and JAXA staff here on the ground, produces weekly, bi-lingual YouTube updates.

Koichi Wakata in Space: JAXA Astronaut Winning at Twitter: @Astro_Wakata

ISS YouTube Updates Vols. 17 & 19: 
Due to like, you know, being in space and all, video production and delivery times can vary. So, sometimes there's a bit of a backlog. As such, this week we're serving up two helpings of Astronaut Wakata's space updates - both uploaded within two hours of this article's publication.

In Vol. 17, Astronaut Wakata introduces the drinking water acquisition process, along with the ISS food storage cabinet system. The astronauts' food, sealed in small bags like military rations, is kept in soft, velcroed cabinets - and it's great to see it just kind of floating in there (particularly Astronaut Wakata's favorite, the Russian canned foods). The hand-written labels, including one that simply says "Hint of," are in fantastic juxtaposition to the fact that: It's. Space. Food. 

Important Note: In Vol. 17, starting right around the 00:28 second mark, there's a fantastic space moment. Have a watch. You'll see.

Next up in Vol. 19, (Vol. 18 is more food stuff) Astronaut Wakata displays, describes, and then dons the Russian 'Penguin Suit.' This particular pair of coveralls is equipped with an axial resistance system, i.e., the head to toe downward force we experience in Earth-normal gravity is simulated in suit form. With a series of bungie cords thingys, the suit applies force from the bottom of the feet all the way to the shoulders, thus approximating the stress we all feel down here, and thereby helping to prevent the gradual weakening of astronauts' bones.

Enjoy the update, and we'll see you next week with more Koichi Wakata in Space.

Media: JAXA; NASA; Koichi Wakata

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