iDiots: Japanese Toy Robots Animated to Make Fun of Us

iDiots, by Big Lazy Robot - AkihabaraNews.com

Our personal telecommunications devices, our smartphones, have long been well beyond simple "phones." They're broadly applicable, technologically disruptive information and media vectors. Big Lazy Robot's newest video, in really the nicest way, says we're kinda iDiots for wanting them. 

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iDiot: Deliciously, Charmingly Insulting! 
There's actually been some debate about Apple and other electronics firms using a sort of "planned obsolescence" business model, i.e., perfectly timing their product releases to ensure that, when the next one comes out, we'll have little choice but to update to the latest shiny. People who don't understand technology think there could be some merit to the claim. Those who do widely regard the theory as the inane blabber of technologically conservative myopiacs who also lament the demise of the typewriter and still believe that "internet privacy" isn't a complete and utter contradiction of terminology.

In a way, this video manages to make fun of both the tech-challenged and the fanboys, AND the passive masses - and that's something we've just gotta respect. Now, Big Lazy Robot isn't always funny; readers might recall last month's coverage of Keloid, the short film practically begging to be made into a movie. Not by the creators, mind you, just because of how awesomely original it is as a sci-fi concept.

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“The robots were taken from real Japanese robot model kits, and they now hold a privileged position in our freak museum. The bad guy spits real smoke out of its mouth! The environment is made of cardboard houses that were integrated with the help of camera tweaks. It all serves to the purpose of creating a dumb homogeneous atmosphere in which we're defined by what we've got, that is, the same lame things."

...and then good naturedly adding:

"Don't take the message too seriously. This is a promo video we've done to laugh at ourselves. We all have an i-diot inside, and it's so fun!"

Exactly.

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Images: iDiot, by Big Lazy Robot, AkihabaraNews.com

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