Directable Physics Engine recreates 2D anime stylizations in 3D


The Igarashi Lab. at the University of Tokyo is developing a new type of physics engine which can faithfully recreate in 3D the stylizations common to 2D anime.

"Physics engines are used in 3D animation, to generate the motions of hair and clothes. They can do physically correct computing, but the problem is, that's all they can do. The engine we've created makes it possible for artists to adjust such physics computations, in other words, to deform things."

"For example, suppose you wanted to make a rabbit's ears sway through physics computation. If you were asked to make them look like this when seen from the right, with an ordinary physics engine, you couldn't do it. But using our technology, you can do physics computation while meeting specific conditions, such as wanting this shape when the object is seen from that angle."

"This example involves what's called 'ahoge' (foolish hair), which is often seen in Japanese animations. For example, if you want the 'ahoge' to keep pointing in the same direction, that's hard to do with an ordinary physics engine. But our engine can compute how to move the hair while keeping it pointing in the same direction."

"In this example, the inside of the skirt is kept hidden, even if you try to look underneath it. When the camera looks in from below, the skirt becomes firm and sticks closely to the body, so you can create an effect called the 'impenetrable skirt'."

"In Japan, 2D anime culture is very attractive. Recently, 3D technology has reached a high level, and we think it would be great to produce movies that combine the merits of the two. So, we've developed this Directable Physics Engine as a technology to help achieve that."

The Directable Physics Engine runs on the Unity cross-platform game engine, and the source code is available from the lab's website.

Source by:
The University of Tokyo



Related Articles

Wacom releases new lineup of Intuos and Intuos Pro pen tablets


Wacom has released a new lineup of its Intuos series of pen tablets.

Starting with this new range of products, Wacom is also unifying its brands. The new products will be available in two versions: A professional range, the Intuos Pro, with 2,048 levels of pen pressure and angle sensitivity, and an entry-level range, the Intuous, with 1,024 sensitivity levels.

World's lightest and thinnest circuits pave the way for 'imperceptible electronics'



Researchers from Asia and Europe have developed the world’s lightest and thinnest organic circuits, which in the future could be used in a range of healthcare applications.


SEL have developed a range of flexible OLED displays and high PPI LCD panels which use CAAC oxide semiconductors.

"CAAC stands for C-Axis Aligned Crystal. In this material's structure, the crystals are aligned in the c-axis direction. Because CAAC itself is crystalline instead of amorphous, it has much higher reliability. Until now, with oxide semiconductors, reliability was generally thought to be a problem, but using this material solves that problem."


At the University of Tokyo, the Hirose-Tanikawa Lab is doing R&D on a system that virtually creates and affects people's emotional states.

Fujitsu boosts security for multi-service palm-vein authentication system

Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a new identification technology, which enables palm-vein identification to be used securely in a wider range of situations.

Conventional palm-vein identification works by comparing complex vein patterns extracted from images of the user's palm. By contrast, Fujitsu's new technology extracts characteristic components from the vein patterns, and uses them to generate 2,048-bit reference codes which are used for comparison.


This mixed reality interface places virtual characters in the real world. It was developed by the Naemura Lab at the University of Tokyo.

Users can have an animated character jump onto their hand, as well as guide the character onto blocks, creating a novel interactive experience.

"Recently, devices have been developed that can form images in mid-air. We've utilized one of those, and combined it with sensors and a projector, to provide an intuitive display experience where a picture in the air is skillfully merged with the real world."

Keystone Technology's LED vegetable garden system is a cultivation system for indoor plant factories which uses LED lighting instead of sunlight. The most defining feature of the system on display at the company's showroom in Yokohama is its 3-dimensional use of space. - Diginfo - Kosmek robotic hand changer

KOSMEK has developed a robotic hand changer that can switch between robot tools automatically - and with high precision. 


This AquaTop display is a touchscreen display for your bath.

The display is projected onto a bath filled with water mixed with bath salts, and a Kinect is used to detect interaction. It can recognise individual fingers sticking out to of the bath by 1.4 cm or more as well as interactions from above the surface of the water. It is being developed by the Koike Lab. at the University of Electro-Communications.


The Hairlytop Interface is an interactive surface display made of soft solid-state actuators and optical sensors which react to light. Jointly developed by the University of Electro-Communications and Symphodia Phil, when placed on an iPad that is playing a video, it moves organically, like a living thing, in response to changes in the brightness of the screen.

"One feature of this system is that the motion is very cute, like that of an animal. Another feature is that it can be used extremely freely in terms of design."

Low-cost Endoscope That Does Not Use Optical Fiber

ARS develops, designs and manufactures medical endoscopes at a reduced cost. Eyeing demand for low-cost endoscopes in emerging economies, ARS began by selling its products in India in December 2012, and ahead it aims to roll out mass-market models in Southeast Asian and South Asian markets.

Reno J. Tibke - November 02, 2013

JTFF - Japanese Technology from the Future Friday! -

This week it’s wrapping displays that just keep going around the edge of your phone, and a Japanese man, Takaaki Sasaki, the first in line at Tokyo’s Ginza Apple store, was all weepy today when he got the new iPad Air - but it’s not the usual creepily overenthusiastic fandorkboyism, it’s actually kind of touching.

• • •