Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV) - The Future of Transport and Energy is Now in Gumi, South Korea

Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV) - The Future of Transport and Energy is Now in Gumi, South Korea

I am convinced that some of the coolest and most ground-breaking ideas and practical applications of ideas are coming out of Korea.  Put this solidly in that category.

The city of Gumi, South Korea is proving that solutions for future energy and transportation problems are happening NOW…

The Online Electric Vehicle (OLEV), developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), is an electric vehicle that can be charged while stationary or driving, thus removing the need to stop at a charging station. Likewise, an OLEV tram does not require pantographs to feed power from electric wires strung above the tram route.

Following the development and operation of commercialized OLEV trams (at an amusement park in Seoul) and shuttle buses (at KAIST campus), respectively, the City of Gumi in South Korea, beginning on August 6th, is providing its citizens with OLEV public transportation services.

Two OLEV buses will run an inner city route between Gumi Train Station and In-dong district, for a total of 24 km roundtrip. The bus will receive 20 kHz and 100 kW (136 horsepower) electricity at an 85% maximum power transmission efficiency rate while maintaining a 17cm air gap between the underbody of the vehicle and the road surface.

OLEV is a groundbreaking technology that accelerates the development of purely electric vehicles as a viable option for future transportation systems, be they personal vehicles or public transit. This is accomplished by solving technological issues that limit the commercialization of electric vehicles such as price, weight, volume, driving distance, and lack of charging infrastructure.

OLEV receives power wirelessly through the application of the "Shaped Magnetic Field in Resonance (SMFIR)" technology. SMFIR is a new technology introduced by KAIST that enables electric vehicles to transfer electricity wirelessly from the road surface while moving. Power comes from the electrical cables buried under the surface of the road, creating magnetic fields. There is a receiving device installed on the underbody of the OLEV that converts these fields into electricity. The length of power strips installed under the road is generally 5%-15% of the entire road, requiring only a few sections of the road to be rebuilt with the embedded cables.

OLEV has a small battery (one-third of the size of the battery equipped with a regular electric car). The vehicle complies with the international electromagnetic fields (EMF) standards of 62.5 mG, within the margin of safety level necessary for human health. The road has a smart function as well, to distinguish OLEV buses from regular cars—the segment technology is employed to control the power supply by switching on the power strip when OLEV buses pass along, but switching it off for other vehicles, thereby preventing EMF exposure and standby power consumption. As of today, the SMFIR technology supplies 60 kHz and 180 kW of power remotely to transport vehicles at a stable, constant rate.

Dong-Ho Cho, a professor of the electrical engineering and the director of the Center for Wireless Power Transfer Technology Business Development at KAIST, said:

"It's quite remarkable that we succeeded with the OLEV project so that buses are offering public transportation services to passengers. This is certainly a turning point for OLEV to become more commercialized and widely accepted for mass transportation in our daily living."

After the successful operation of the two OLEV buses by the end of this year, Gumi City plans to provide ten more such buses by 2015.

 
Source: 

Related Articles

Reno J. Tibke - November 29, 2013

Toys of the Tokyo Motor Show - AkihabaraNews.com

Anticipatory Socialization

Reno J. Tibke - May 03, 2014

JTFF - Japanese Technology from the Future Friday! - AkihabaraNews.com

This week it’s all about Toyota and California going bananas for hydrogen fuel cell tech, for both buildings and for cars - but mostly for cars, and even though the tech has been just around a corner that seems to be taking about 35 years to navigate, word on the street is that it might actually be reaching feasibility...we'll see. 

SCENE IN TOKYO: Hatsune Miku Minivan in Akihabara!
In this publication’s namesake Akihabara district (pre-AKB48ification, mind you), one of the most important categories used to evaluate individuals is known as the Ambient Otaku Threat Level Barometer. How do we judge this artifact of otaku culture?

Thanko's new device Eye-Catch-Pre-Crash-Alarm is able to detect your fatigue while you drive and it prevents you from dozing off at the wheel.

Nissan announced that they are going to stop the production of the convertible two-seater model "Fairlady Z Roadster" after the end of September.

The Fairlady Z Roadster was added to the Fairlady Z series in October 2009. It is lighter than the basic model and has great motion performance due to its 3.7-liter VQ37VHR engine.

Toyota's New THUMS 5 Virtual Human Model Visualizes Accident Impact
The brand-new model is called THUMS Version 5. In this version, Toyota has added to the already complex modeling software additional weak and tense muscle models that allow the user to simulate the various positions in which a human body experiences a car crash.

Nayalan Moodley - January 20, 2016

The Rides of Tokyo Auto Salon 2016 (GALLERY)
Turbo kits to make the new Mazda MX-5 and older Toyota 86 fast enough to actually be fun, extremely finely crafted components, all at the biggest Tokyo Auto Salon ever (325,501 peeps over 3 days). Some amazing, lustworthy rides to be seen in this finely assembled gallery of awesome.

Editor - May 29, 2015

Kumamon Gets an RC Dune Buggy
Japanese hobby kit and RC car maker Tamiya has been chasing the Kumamon cash dragon for over a year now, and along with last December’s Kumamon tractor RC car (probably because Kumamoto = agriculture), an RC standard dune buggy has now entered the lineup.

Nayalan Moodley - February 14, 2016

Driving Gunma for #MyJapanStory (VIDEO)
From 2008 to 2013, I lived in Gunma Prefecture, drove a Nissan Silvia S14, and found that the best parts of the prefecture - and, in fact, the country - are more often than not the places that are a bit of a drive past the typical destinations, and the best experiences you can have are the ones that you share with the amazing people you meet on the long, winding road.

Green House is going to release a cigar socket USB charger adapter "GH-CCU2A" in mid-August.

GH-CCU2A has 2 USB ports built-in so that it is able to simultaneously charge up to 2 devices at a time such as a smartphone, iPhone and iPad. Each port is compatible with up to 2.1A output, which enables you to charge 2 iPads at the same time.

It has an overcorrect protective fuse and LED light to check the condition of its power distribution.

Pages